Tabatha McFadyen

Tabatha McFadyen onstage at the 2014 McDonald's Sydney Eisteddfod. Photo: WinkiPoP Media

An interview with Tabatha McFadyen

Since 1933.

perform.

In the 2014 McDonald’s Sydney Eisteddfod, Tabatha McFadyen won both the second scholarship in the Sydney Eisteddfod McDonald’s Operatic Aria and the second scholarship in Sydney Eisteddfod’s Opera & Arts Support Group Vocal Scholarship, and there is no doubt that she will go on to achieve great things.

Tabatha has already appeared as a soprano soloist in the Camerata of St John’s, the acclaimed collaboration with actor/director Tama Matheson’s Johann Sabastien, featured as Prilepa in Tchaikovsky’s Queen of Spades and since appearing in the 2014 Sydney Eisteddfod, she has won First Place in the women’s under 25 division of the 49th International Dvorak Singing Competition.

The glamorous and talented Tabatha shares her advice on performing in the Sydney Eisteddfod and why she aspires to become a professional opera singer.

Why did you start performing? 

I began dancing when I was three and decided that I wanted to be a ballerina. I also became interested in making up dances and wanted to be a choreographer.   In my early teens, I started singing and wanted to be in musical theatre, then, one day I heard somebody singing Schubert’s beautiful songs. It was a real awakening and all I’ve wanted ever since is to become a classical singer.

What is your dream, what would you like to achieve? 

Well, I guess I want a singing career. I want to be somebody whom people enjoy working with, and after 10 years training I hope to follow in famous footsteps.

How has competing helped you as a performer? 

I’ve learnt to be more resilient and to appreciate the importance of following my own path.

What would you say to someone that was thinking about entering the Sydney Eisteddfod?  What advice do you have to offer?

I would definitely tell them to enter.  This is one competition where whether you win or lose, the whole experience is valuable and you get constructive criticism from expert adjudicators, too.